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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
a big weapons sale soon. the buyer, saudi arabia. national security correspondent jennifer griffin tells us what the u.s. is selling. it would be the largest arms deal in u.s. history. 60 billion dollars in military aircraft to saudi arabia's air force over the next ten years. the pentagon officials say the deal would include 84 f-15 fighter jets. 70 apache helicopters, 72 blackhawks and 60 little birds followed by a 30 billion dollar package to improve saudi's naval defenses. if congress approves the sale. it's designed to send a signal to neighboring iran, whose march toward nuclear weapons is of growing concern to its arab neighbors. >> every message that the u.s. sends is being heard loud and clear in iran and certainly any sign that the u.s. and saudi arabia are deepening their defense relationships, certainly any sign that saudi arabia will have a stronger deterrent force, i think, enters into the calculations of the iraniaeye rain. >> reporter: there could be a political component. boeing argues the sale could support up to 77,000 jobs in 44 states. the u.s. doesn't buy f-15's an
the midterm? >> let's bring in democratic strategist jennifer palmieri and republican strategist. doesn't everybody want a tax cut? you don't want to answer this question. >> no, i do. the polling is interesting on this in that a majority of people don't support extending the bush tax cuts. >> themselves they do. no, they don't. >> 52% of americans say no. i think it is because they think the tax cuts all go to rich people. when you say should you extend them for rich people or extend for only the middle class they pick only the middle class. what is great about what john boehner has done is he has clarified the difference -- >> by saying he would sign that bill. let me try something by you. if nothing happens, we all know everybody's taxes go up in january. who wins then? if everybody walks to the voting booth and nothing has been done and everybody's taxes go up in january, who wins then? >> it is not going to happen in a vacuum. there will be a floor fight. if they can't get a bill passed the democrats will say this is what the election is about. making this decision. >> won't people
correspondent, jennifer griffin has more. >> reporter: soldiers called it the most dangerous place in the world, the war documentary, restrepo illustrated how dangerous it was in the valley. a lot of men became heros out there. just one was chosen for the medal of choohonor, the first recipient of the nation's highest medal of valor, salvatore guinta assigned to the 173rd air borne brigade told us about what he remembered of october 25, 2007 when he rescued two soldiers while taking heavy enemy fire. >> we walked into an l-shaped ambush and you could see the muzzle flashes, from bullets leaving the enemy's guns that weren't too far away. everyone was at risk. sometimes they whistled and sometimes they cracked and there is a close you got hit but not hurt close and the close where it snaps by your head but you are not hit and the whiz, that is a little bit further away than the crack. >> reporter: he saw sergeant josh brennan being hauled away by the taliban. >> we may never have gotten my son's body back and he saw they were carrying him into the woods, and, they were -- he was captured by the
. . he is the lone survivor of the attack. the defense says, yes, my client raped and killed jennifer petitt. the key here is will this deft steven hayes get the death penalty or not? he offered to plead guilty if prosecutors took the death penalty off the table. prosecutors said no, that's how airtight they believe their case is. he and another man allegedly broke into the home three years ago in a suburban upscale neighborhood here in krthd. middle of the night the family was sleeping. tortured them. led them to a bank to take out $15,000. ended up killing them and burned their house down. on the stand today the lone survivor told in his testimony, told the jury the defendant said if he gives them what yo want we won't hurt you. i may have yelled out hey, and then a voice yelled back at him saying don't worry. it's all going to be over in a couple of minutes. in fact, prosecutors have said that that the testimony that the jury will hear, the audience will hear in this case, will rock your inner core because of what this man went through. he said he was tied up by his wrist an inkels
washington knows best, we can it will what you money you are going to keep and not. >> thank you, jennifer and ryan. a hot hand. >>> up next, what's harry reid doing with the military and his don't ask don't tell policy and he wants a vote. what happens inside the military if they get rid of don't ask and don't tell? we're going to talk about those questions, the politics and reality of getting rid of don't ask don't tell and having open service for people, which looks to be the future. the question is when is it coming and how are people going to handle it? this is "hardball," only on msnbc. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want to help when the unexpected happens. whatever you want to do, members project from american express can help you take the first step. vote, volunteer, or donate for the causes you believe in at membersproject.com. take charge of making a difference. [ male announcer ] at ge capital, we're out there every day with clients like jetblue -- financing their fleet, sharing our expertise, and working with people who are changing the face of bus
of illinois. joining me now to talk about this is deputy personal finance editor jennifer merritt. she oversaw the research for the "wall street journal." the bottom line here is for that first job, businesses seem to be preferring not the ivy leagues, but others. these are no slouch schools. this is not like, oh, gosh, let's take second best. those are great schools. why, though, this over the ivy leagues? >> for these entry level jobs people are hoping to grow candidates into the company with. and so one of the reasons is they come very academically prepared. they've all had a major. so they've really got the great, deep skills in a subject. and then because they've got to really fend for themselves at these big schools and take advantage of various resources and network and the wide networks. they're also sort of able to come in, hit the ground running, and that well roundedness. >> ivy league graduates are seen as less -- >> they're less technically prepared in a lot of ways. most ivy league schools don't have majors in a traditional sense, don't have a lot of that bread and butter course
million. that's how much jennifer lopez will earn next year as an "american idol" judge. congrats to j. lo but you only have a one-year deal. be productive! >> all right, brian. in the meantime in, the past, when you lost your wallet, your biggest concern was canceling your credit cards, right? well, now, the risk is a lot bigger. you can lose your entire identity. our next guest had his identity stolen and he says he can steal yours just by looking at your local grocery store savings card. he is the author of "privacy means profit, prevent identity theft and secure your bottom line." some people stole your identity and charged up $300,000. >> they did, yeah many my business partner used it to commit a whole series of crimes. >> your business partner? >> my business partner. then i was held liable for it. >> that's crazy. >> now, for people who don't have a business partner and n't worry about them, you know, raking them over the coals financially, one of the mistakes is we put way too much on our facebook. if there's some unscrupulous person that wants to steal your identity, it's a j
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)